News

Remembering Civil Rights Journalist Roy Reed

Roy Reed in An Independent Judiciary

Acclaimed Civil Rights reporter Roy Reed passed away this week at the age of 87.  Roy Reed was an award-winning author and journalist, covering many of the defining moments of the Civil Rights era, including the March on Selma.  Read more about Reed’s life and work here.

And see Roy Reed speak about the integration of Little Rock Central High School in our film An Independent Judiciary.

Political gerrymandering goes before the Supreme Court

(Wisconsin Legislative Technology Services Bureau)

The Supreme Court hears oral arguments today in a case that could reshape how legislative districts are drawn in the United States.  Every ten years, when the U.S. does a census, political maps across the country are redrawn by state legislatures.  This gives the political party in control of the state legislature enormous power because they are the ones who get to decide how these new districts will be drawn.  Now, the Supreme Court has ruled that you can’t draw districts based on racial lines (something they reenforced two times last term).  But making districts that benefit one party over the other by diluting the impact of the minority party’s vote?  That’s been totally legal.  

Today the Supreme Court will hear a challenged to the way Wisconsin drew its legislative map in a case called Gill v. Whitford.  Following the last census in 2010, the Republican-controlled Wisconsin legislature redrew their districts map is such a way that, in 2012, Republicans carried less than half of the overall vote (48.6 %) but won nearly two thirds of the seats in the state assembly.  The Supreme Court is set to decide whether maps like Wisconsin’s are unconstitutional.

Learn more about the history of racially-based gerrymandering in our film One Person, One Vote

Happy Constitution Day!

230 years ago today, delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania signed the Constitution of the United States.  

Celebrate the birthday of our foundering document and check out our latest film in The Constitution Project series, The Confrontation Clause: Crawford v. Washington.

Full Text of the Original Document.

 

 

 

 

 

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Watch our new film about the Confrontation Clause!

 

Check out our new film The Confrontation Clause: Crawford v. Washington.  You can find the whole film streaming online for free at the Annenberg Classroom website.  The film tells the story of how we got the right to confront our accusers in court (and what happened to one famous person who didn’t have that right).  But what happens when your accuser isn’t a person but a taped confession?

 

 

 

 

 

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Thurgood Marshall became the first African American Supreme Court Justice 50 years ago

 

The National Archives

50 years ago, Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993) became the first African American to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States when he was confirmed by the Senate on August 30, 1967.  Marshall was one of the most prominent legal minds of the Civil Rights era, winning 29 of the 32 cases he argued before the Supreme Court.  In 1952, he argued the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which overturned segregation and the doctrine of “separate but equal” that had ben in place in the South since Plessy v. Ferguson (1896).  Marshall served on the Court for 24 years.

Learn more about Brown v. Board of Education in our film An Independent Judiciary.